This Sunday was all about my November Monocle issue. And I loved it!

Today is Sunday. Today feels like doing nothing (except read my Monocle magazine).

Today felt like lightning a bergamot candle, laying on a couch, crossing my feet and sipping some tea while reading something. So I did just that!

I did just that but (for a change) I didn’t take a book. Instead, I took my Monocle magazine. And, no, this post isn’t sponsored by them.

I received my November issue about ten days ago and looked through it quickly, as I always do. But as some of you might know the Monocle Magazine is usually quite a piece to read. Monocle is big and thick, and it’s dense too. So, I usually turn the pages fast to get a taste of it, and I come back to it later.

A magazine for guys.

The thing I enjoy the most with Monocle is its variety, its eclecticism. Besides, I find the magazine very fit for guys because there’s not too much advertising and the whole thing is actually quite masculine. I’m guessing we’re their main target.

Anyway, these guys write about everything. They write about fashion, they showcase luxury watches and plane-related stuff too. They write about architecture and creators of all sorts, they write about restaurants and places you need to see all over the world, but they also talk about business and politics.

I’m clearly not a fashion guy and I don’t travel enough to be able to enjoy all the fancy places they recommend. That’s for sure.

But I’m curious and I enjoy nice things, so I’m always finding something interesting to read in there. Actually, if you’ve read the “about page” of I’ll Make You Think SMART, I’m sure you’ve understood why I became a Monocle reader by now, right?

To read in this month’s Monocle Issue

I was mainly interested in two articles in the November issue, though.

One was an interview with the Swiss President. The thing is, the November Monocle is largely on Switzerland so the interview makes sense. Still, I found interesting to read an interview halfway between casual and totally serious.

Another article I was particularly interested in was about co-working spaces and the way they develop all around the world. The paper is well illustrated and gives a lot of food for thought in terms of imagination, in terms of architecture, in terms of dynamics and dynamism.

After all, why should work be about cubicles and boring workspaces? It’s nice to see that your workplace can actually be designed and thought around the worker, it’s nice to think that work isn’t just about doing hours and adapting to the framework.

It’s also nice to see that the co-working system gives people some wings.

Those days lots of people enjoy working from coffee shops instead of sitting at work! Some people like the atmosphere, others like the noises surrounding them (did you know that some apps actually reproduce that kind of noise to help you focus on what you do and be more productive?). I personally do it regularly, I’m not too sure why, to be honest, but I like it.

They give more examples, talk about people who just use co-working spaces as a place to sit between meetings, write about co-working spaces providing parents with kindergartens… thus making it easy for them to adopt the alternative to work as the main work model! Inspiring…

At the right time?

This whole article and discussion just came at the right moment I guess. Not that I’m thinking about reviewing my work style, no.

Recently though, I posted three reviews on my book reviews blog which totally relate to this idea of working differently, from another place. From any place, actually.

Two of the books were both written by Chris Guillebeau and the third was by Tim Ferris. And all discussed ways of setting micro businesses that can actually allow you to change your life by reinventing your career path. To both Guillebeau and Ferris, the interest of setting such a business is that you can actually run it from a beach!

>> See the book review of Side Hustle here <<

>> See the book review of The $100 Startup here <<

>> See the book review of The 4-Hour Workweek here <<

What I like about those business models isn’t the beach, though. Of course, working from a beach must be nice, but what I like most is the idea that you can interact with others, in a work context, without being bound by hierarchy and other professional relationship contexts.

In sum, becoming your own boss sets you free, and I find that those working spaces designed to provide entrepreneurs and people with an alternative working style is inspiring. A good way to feel free anyway!

That was my food for thought of the day! Do you use those working spaces? Do you work from coffee shops? Feel free to use the comment box below! And don’t forget to read!

Happy reading!

A.

     

%d bloggers like this: